Heritage

Heritage-1

The 7th and 13th holes were completely rebuilt for the l967 PGA Championship at Columbine because of severe damage from the l965 flood. Sculpturing the design and reconstruction of all, or part of six holes damaged by the floodwaters, was required. Other changes included redoing the fourth and sixth greens, and repairing the fairways and tee boxes on the fourth, fifth and l4th holes.

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The 7th and 13th holes were completely rebuilt for the l967 PGA Championship at Columbine because of severe damage from the l965 flood. Sculpturing the design and reconstruction of all, or part of six holes damaged by the floodwaters, was required. Other changes included redoing the fourth and sixth greens, and repairing the fairways and tee boxes on the fourth, fifth and l4th holes.

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As General Manager during the l967 PGA Championship at Columbine, R.E. (Gene) Reynolds was responsible for supervising varied menus for each day of the tournament, and serving an average of 7500 persons a day. An additional 10,000 others were served snacks each day and thousands more received bar service. There were also major cocktail receptions hosted by the club, as well as security and first aid issues to oversee. Reynolds and his staff of 75 spent more than a year preparing for the event.

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Twice a qualifier for the PGA Championship, Tony Novitsky was Head Professional during the l967 PGA at Columbine. Prior to moving to Columbine in l961, he served five years as the first civilian golf professional at Warren Air Force Base in Cheyenne, Wyoming where he was a second lieutenant in charge of the golf course.

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Because the PGA tournament had to be moved back a year due to the flood, Ken Voorhies, Columbine greens superintendent worked under three National PGA presidents in getting Columbine ready for the championship. Voorhies supervised the construction of more than 60 new fairway bunkers. All were designed to exacting specifications, with many incorporating the new "saw tooth" design, which required extreme sensitivity. Bunkers around the greens were further refined to narrow the gateway.

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With his putting verging on sensational, Don January tries body English to coax his putt in during the l967 PGA Championship at Columbine. January, who had lost a l961 PGA playoff to Jerry Barber, shot a three-under-par 69 to beat Don Massengale by two strokes in an l8-hole playoff on Monday afternoon.

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Don January, winner in a playoff of the l967 PGA Tournament at Columbine Country Club, is congratulated by runner -up Don Massengale (right). Also on hand were PGA officials and Tournament Chair Ev Collier (left, next to Denver Mayor Tom Currigan). January received a first place check of $25,000. The tournament had a record turnout of more than 83,000 spectators.

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Official PGA Columbine Hostesses were adorned in western attire and chauffeured golf pros to and from their hotels during the PGA Championship. According to General Chairman of the women's PGA activities, Mrs. Geneva Waynick, "We chose the modified Western look because we will be on Telstar, will be seen in Germany, and they would be disappointed if we didn't look the part. Germans are so gung-ho on Westerns."

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JoAnne Carner became the second woman player to earn over one million-dollars, when she received the $22,500 first-prize in the 1980 Columbia Savings LPGA Classic at Columbine Country Club. Carner thrilled a final-day crowd of about 17,500 by firing a one-under 71 to bring her four-day total to a sizzling 10-under par 278. Other notable women professionals who played in the tournament were Judy Rankin, Beth Daniel, Donna Caponi, Kathy Whitworth, Patty Sheehan, and Nancy Lopez-Melton, who shot a scorching 64 the final day. A four-day crowd estimated at 42,500, easily set a tournament record.

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Colorado Governor Dan Thornton (center) looks on as J.E. Manning (right); Chairman of the Club's Board of Directors presents a gold membership card, for the first lifetime membership in Columbine Country Club to President Dwight D. Eisenhower at the White House in l955.

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President Dwight Eisenhower's presidential planes were named the "Columbine." There were three Columbines, all of them four-engine, propeller-driven Lockheed Constellations. Columbine I served General Eisenhower in Europe while he was commander of SHAPE (NATO) from 1951-1952; Columbine II was his presidential plane from 1953-1954; and Columbine III served as the presidential plane from 1954-1961. Columbine III is currently on display at the U.S. Air Force Museum at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio.

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Colorado Governor John Love adjusts his honorary "Gold Sponsor" golf cap, made of golf fabric and designed for buyers of "Gold Sponsor" season tickets for the l967 PGA Golf Championship. Leaders of Columbine's women volunteers shown are (from left) Mrs. Geneva Waynick, general chairman of women's PGA activities; Mrs. Helene Mack, admissions committee vice chairman, and Mrs. George J. Stevenson, admission committee chair. Gold sponsors received clubhouse privileges, admission to the exclusive "Gold Room," and reserved parking.

Heritage-8

Columbine Country Club Founder J. Everett Collier (l907-l986) and his wife Lucy were ardent golfers and saw to it that Columbine adopted a "family" club environment. Ev Collier's club experience included serving as a past president of Lakewood C.C., a board member of Cherry Hills and as the first president of Columbine. Due to the historic South Platte River flood and postponement of what was to be the l966 Golden Anniversary of the PGA at Columbine until l967, Mr. Collier served as the longest PGA tournament chairman. In addition to dealing with all of the challenges associated with the flood and postponement, Collier also had to survive a bitter civil war between rival factions of the PGA before his dream could be realized. A simmering feud between the touring professionals and the executive branch of the PGA over control of the multi-million dollar tour erupted into all out war two months prior to the championship at Columbine. An eleventh hour truce was reached, allowing the tournament to proceed. Due to Collier's leadership, Columbine's outstanding membership and staff, and outside volunteers, the golf course was beautiful with good turf, new greens, tees, trees and water lines and the 49th PGA Championship at Columbine was a huge success.

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